How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Do you have anything to add to our daily newswire? Then comment on our news and post your news story here!

Moderators: CPUagnostic, MTX, Celt, Hammer_Time, Sauron_Daz, Tacitus, Anna

How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Hammer_Time » Fri Jan 11, 2013 7:47 pm

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/01/11/ ... plan-works

"With the 'six-strikes' anti-piracy plan set to begin in the U.S. soon, TorrentFreak has gotten its hands on a document showing how Verizon in particular will be dealing with copyright-infringing users. For your first and second strike, Verizon will email you and leave you a voicemail informing you that your account is involved in copyright infringement. For your third and fourth strikes, the ISP will automatically redirect your browser to a page that requires you to acknowledge receiving the alerts. They'll also play a video about the dangers of infringement. For your fifth and sixth strikes, they give you three options: massively throttle your connection for a few days, wait two weeks and then throttle your connection, or file an appeal with an arbitration service for $35. TorrentFreak points out that the MPAA and RIAA can obtain the connection information of repeat infringers, with which they can then take legal action."


http://www.techdirt.com/articles/201301 ... wifi.shtml

Details Of Various Six Strikes Plans Revealed; May Create Serious Problems For Free WiFi

from the the-death-of-free-wifi dept

Ah, unintended consequences. TorrentFreak has been doing a fantastic job sussing out the details of how various ISPs are going to implement the infamous "six strikes" plan. Earlier, it had found that AT&T's plan was to block access to frequently visited websites, while the fourth strike will include redirections to "educational material."

Time Warner Cable, for its part, has said that it will direct users to a landing page, effectively interrupting your ability to surf the web without it being crazy annoying. The latest is the discovery of the details of Verizon's plan, which will involve reducing speeds of the connection to a slow poke speed of 256kbps. I don't know if you've tried surfing the web at 256kbps lately, but it's ridiculously frustrating, because pages are optimized for much higher speeds:

Comcast and Cablevision (the two other participants) haven't leaked out any details yet, but you have to imagine that the situations would be similar. One thing to note, this isn't really a "six strikes" plan at all. AT&T's more draconian actions appear to kick in after the 4th notice. Verizon's kick in after the 5th notice. I know it's been popular to call it a "six strikes" plan, but our initial read suggested that it was really more of a five strikes plan, since mitigation factors were supposed to start after five. It's interesting to see that AT&T seems to want to push that even further.

All of the ISPs, of course, will say that they're not "cutting people off" from the internet, though they are making connections barely usable. Especially troubling is that, as TorrentFreak reveals in the latest post on this, at least Verizon's responses will apply to businesses as well. So that cafe down the street that has free WiFi... may quickly be throttled down to 256kbps. That will likely mean a lot less free WiFi out there, which is a significant and worrisome consequence of this program.


All of these programs seem focused on driving people to "educational content" about copyright infringement. It will be quite fascinating to see what kind of educational content is provided. We've seen in the past that most such attempts are really bad and one-sided. Even YouTube's "copyright school" is ridiculously one-sided and perpetuates myths about copyright, and suggests that fair use is too complex for you to even bother trying to understand.

Also, as the strikes get higher, there are two things to be aware of: ISPs are then more likely to hand over info to the copyright holders, meaning that it could still lead to copyright holders directly suing. That is, the "mitigation" factors are not, in any way, the sum total of the possible consequences for those accused. On top of that, we still fully expect that at least some copyright holders are planning to insist that ISPs who are aware of subscribers with multiple "strikes" are required under law to terminate their accounts. At least the RIAA has indicated that this is its interpretation of the DMCA's clause that requires service providers to have a "termination policy" for "repeat infringers." So it's quite likely that even if the ISPs have no official plan to kick people off the internet entirely under the plan, some copyright holders will still push for exactly that kind of end result.


This is crap but the lobbyists and greedy Media companies have finally won...as expected.

I wonder how long it will take before this shows up in Canada?? ( Rogers, Shaw, and Bell ) :evil: :fist: :cry:
The richest man is not he who has the most, but he who needs the least. No good deed goes unpunished...

Image
User avatar
Hammer_Time
Rantmeister Mod
 
Posts: 33794
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, Mordor

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Sauron_Daz » Sat Jan 12, 2013 2:50 am

How badly does your government want this?
We never think of us as being one of Them. We are always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.
User avatar
Sauron_Daz
Evil OverLord Mod
 
Posts: 34560
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Silver » Sat Jan 12, 2013 11:48 am

I predict Verizon will loose many customers over this.
Specs:

Intel Core i7 4930K, Kingston 32GB
ASUS GeForce GTX 770 4GB, ASUS P9X79

Aiming for impossible goals forces thinking beyond mere extrapolation of existing achievements.
User avatar
Silver
X-bit Guru
 
Posts: 3739
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2003 12:26 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Hammer_Time » Sat Jan 12, 2013 12:49 pm

Sauron_Daz wrote:How badly does your government want this?


You know we are stuck with Harper, anything the Americans want he does... they say "jump" and he says "How High"???? Always...

Rogers Cable ISP here in Canada sent me an email some years ago telling me I violated copyright by downloading "Melrose Place" tv show ( oh the shame and embarrassment!! :oops: :lol: ) and telling me to cease and desist.. I pay for Rogers Cable TV VIP package ( have already paid to watch the show legally ) but I don't want or own a PVR so I dl the shows I miss... but I have already paid to watch this show.. bastages...then they directed me to American "Hulu tv" website to watch tv shows, but of course this is ONLY for Americans and I was blocked from viewing anything on hulutv.com because I am in Canada ( same goes for anyone outside of continental USA, unless you are a paying subscriber, no more free hulu tv anymore, its all pay up front model now.. ). Just saying how ridiculous this whole thing is in general...so of course what happens in America, happens in Canada a short time later, always has , always will...we are America Junior in every way, sad to say...and Harper is more than happy to continue that "tradition"...fartknocker and sellout...

Silver, it is not just Verizon, it is the top 5 ISP's in America doing this , and of course the smaller ISP's will be forced to get onboard with it down the road as well:

The six strikes system is officially helmed by an industry coalition called the Center for Copyright Information (CCI), which was created by the MPAA and RIAA. It counts the U.S.'s five top ISPs under its umbrella: AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Verizon."


http://www.extremetech.com/internet/140 ... ed-to-know

In nine days, five major ISPs — Comcast, AT&T, Time Warner, Verizon, and Cablevision — will activate the Copyright Alert System, colloquially known as the “six strikes” program. Implementation of the program has been delayed for nearly a year, while the various ISPs, studios, and publishers hammered out the details.

The five ISPs listed above have agreed to rely on the copyright infringement data provided by a data analytics program known as MarkMonitor. MarkMonitor is to be administered by Stroz Friedberg, a company that specializes in “Digital Risk Management & Investigations.” Time Warner Cable, AT&T, and Verizon have shared (or leaked) information on how they intend to implement and communicate CAS; Cablevision and Comcast are unlikely to deviate much from their approach. Internet service providers have approached this idea very gingerly, fearing a consumer backlash.

Time Warner Cable

TWC will notify users by email or phone if they are found to have downloaded infringing content. The fifth or sixth time an infringement is detected, the ISP will display a pop-up message that only disappears after the user acknowledges that they’ve been notified they downloaded copyrighted material. Since multiple users frequently access the same modem, every system connected to the service will be notified.

Time Warner’s final penalty is to block access to “popular sites” for several days. The company has not released a list of sites it blocks or any information on how long the block will last. It has stated that account termination is not an option.

Verizon

Verizon will first notify customers, then force customers to acknowledge that the notification was received. It won’t block any websites, but will severely throttle data connections for several days. The company hasn’t given specific information on how much it will throttle connections, or for how long. It has also said that account termination is not a possible penalty.

AT&T

AT&T will notify customers of infringement the first three times. After that, users will be blocked from accessing “certain websites” until they complete an educational tutorial, as discussed below:

We’re all friends here

The Memo of Understanding (MoU) between the various ISPs, studios, and publishers is a world away from the arrogant, high-handed demands that characterized SOPA & PIPA. It reserves substantial power to the ISPs and gives them broad discretionary powers as far as dealing with cases of infringement. Thus far, ISPs are choosing not to exercise their right to terminate accounts.

The MoU is, in many ways, a model example of restraint and common sense. There’s a defined seven-day grace period between each warning; customers can’t rack up seven infringements in a single weekend. If the user appeals the infringement claim, no further action is taken until the appeal is resolved. There’s also a 12-month limit on infringement claim counts. Rack up five strikes, then stay clean for a year, and you’re back to strike one.

With a side dish of blatant self interest

Hollywood being what it is, there’s already been a few issues along the road to smooth implementation. Stroz Friedberg, the company hired to oversee MarkMonitor, once lobbied extensively on behalf of the RIAA. The RIAA mysteriously forgot to mention that to both of its fellow studios and the ISPs. The Center for Copyright Information (that’s the joint organization the two groups founded) was caught off guard by that detail, and has promised to bring in a second consultant to ensure that the work done by Stroz Friedberg was on the level.


I believe the movie and music companies when they say they have no intent of suing everyone. ISPs have come to the table on this topic with extreme reluctance; they’ve got zero interest in taking actions that could alienate customers. Nevertheless, the dynamics of the situation have subtly shifted. Now, if you allegedly commit copyright infringement, your name goes on a list. Your ISP may reset your number of strikes to 0 after a year, but that doesn’t mean the MPAA/RIAA have waived the right to sue.

Want to appeal? Pay up

Finally, there’s the question of appeals. The good news is that all additional action against a user is suspended during an appeal. The bad news is that you have to pay $35 to appeal in the first place. You’ll get the money back if the appeal is upheld. The appeal is handled by the American Arbitration Association, but details on how the process functions are extremely sketchy. The CCI has stated that it expects there to be “very few” appeals, and the $35 fee is designed to ensure that only people who are genuinely mis-targeted will bother to appeal it.

On the one hand, this actually makes sense. There’s no hard penalty for infringement beyond acknowledging that it occurred and promising not to do it again. The system is designed with certain safeguards to ensure that people don’t rack up 50 infringements in the span of a day. Service termination isn’t on the table.

Whether or not this system works will depend on how the CCI and AAA treat the inevitable stream of false positives and fair use defenses. Most of the time, a little common sense is enough to keep mistakes from exploding into national news. Then again, copyright trolls (and the RIAA in particular) have been known to sue elderly people who had never owned computers, as well as dead people.

After SOPA and PIPA, the content industry is starting from a position of zero good faith. The MoU reads well, but whether it counts for anything is debatable.

What this means for pirates and the privacy-inclined:

If your Internet service is provided by one of the five companies above and you don’t want your data to be subject to this sort of analysis, it’s time to explore Tor or a VPN service. I can’t speak for any of my US-based colleagues, but I intend to do so, and not because I pirate. For me, the question is: “Do I trust the MPAA or RIAA to exercise good faith?”

After ten years of watching these organizations mindlessly attack everything, the only possible answer is “Nope.” The RIAA can’t resist the temptation to be a little slimy, even when circumstances with the CCI overwhelmingly favored full disclosure. The MPAA is run by former Senator Chris Dodd — the man who criticized the anti-SOPA blackout day as “hyperbole,” a “PR stunt,” and a “gimmick…designed to punish elected and administration officials who are working diligently to protect American jobs from foreign criminals.” He may have tempered his rhetoric in the months following SOPA’s overwhelming defeat, but that’s not the same as having a change of heart.

Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Verizon have a certain interest in protecting their users, but they’ve got a much bigger interest in securing preferential streaming and content distribution deals. The majority of Americans have two choices for broadband service, at the most. Some, like myself, have only one.

In a situation like this, an extra $10-$15 for a VPN buys an awful lot of peace of mind.
The richest man is not he who has the most, but he who needs the least. No good deed goes unpunished...

Image
User avatar
Hammer_Time
Rantmeister Mod
 
Posts: 33794
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, Mordor

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby DIREWOLF75 » Sat Jan 12, 2013 12:53 pm

Maybe someone should test them?

Set up a team of people doing HUGE amounts of filesharing, of freeware files only...
If they jump at it, sue their asses into the ground.
This has been an objective and completely impartial message from the propaganda bureau of DIREWOLF75. Thank you for reading. Have a nice day.
Image
User avatar
DIREWOLF75
X-bit Goon
 
Posts: 15170
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: Isthmus of Baldur (modernly known as Bollnäs), Sweden

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Hammer_Time » Sat Jan 12, 2013 1:09 pm

:twisted: But how can one sue for "freeware"?

Edit: also found this tidbit:

http://www.dailytech.com/Report+Six+Str ... e29338.htm

Report: Six Strikes Piracy Plan a Nightmare for Landlords, Businesses

Jason Mick (Blog) - December 4, 2012 5:03 PM

Ambiguity will lead to the innocent suffering alongside the guilty, argues report

TIME magazine's Matt Peckham has offered up a compelling argument on why the upcoming "six strikes" plan is fundamentally flawed.  "Six Strikes" is the term bandied about for the voluntary collaboration by internet service providers (ISPs) and big media groups like the Motion Picture Association of America to "educate" users on the "dangers" of piracy.

The proposal -- unlike past efforts like the failed SOPA -- does not involve the government.  And it does not involve internet "capital punishment" -- termination of paying customers.  But if customers are found pirating by MarkMonitor -- the group contracted by the Center for Copyright Information (CCI) to filter ISP traffic looking for P2P streams with infringed IP -- ISPs will be liable to either slow users connections or force them to take "classes" to regain access to the connection.

The move is a win for ISPs; they'll likely be able to provide a lesser degree of service to many of their customers while claiming it's in the noble name of "intellectual property protection".  Reduced service means less bandwidth and data consumed, which in turn means cost savings, which in turn means more profit.

And big media is clinging to the notion that if it can just get some habitual pirates to abandon their foul ways, they'll instead turn to legally buying all sorts of content, triggering a golden age of media profits.

Of course there's little signs of that being the case -- pirates actually tend to already be the biggest buyers of legal content, so it seems relatively unlikely they'll buy more if forced to forgo their pirating.

What's more, Mr. Peckham poses an intriguing scenario of why the current IPv4 based plan in simply too dumb to work.  He comments:

My condo complex (I'm an owner) has 48 units. It was built in 2003, so it's relatively new. At the time, the builders had the foresight to wire each unit with Ethernet — a drop in each room, everything connected back to aggregate wire closets. Near my front door (and all the front doors of all the units) is a mini-wire closet with a switch/hub that connects my unit to a central switch/hub in a locked room on the property.

That, in turn, plugs into a high-speed cable modem — a cable modem that's shared across all 48 units. We're technically shielded from each other using a special box that "firewalls" each private IP and can control how much bandwidth it's allocated, etc. Whether we elect to use it or pay for our own service instead, all 48 units have access to this shared Internet
.


He argues that for business owners or owners of residential units (like himself), the plan will create a nightmarish scenario of new costs and enforcement responsibilities, in which ultimately the innocent may suffer along with the guilty.  He writes:
 
You can probably see where I'm headed. With "six strikes," any of the residents in the complex who — knowingly or unknowingly — engage in an act of copyright violation, could incur an alert. Who's going to see that alert? Probably me, as the technical contact for the ISP (that or our property management company, at which point it'll route back to me).

At this point I'm not sure what happens. The IP address MarkMonitor's software is going to see, presumably, is our public one, not the private address of the device that's been singled out on our condo complex's network. How do we identify the perpetrator? Should we identify the perpetrator? If our ISP says we're in violation, is it incumbent on us to run our own tracking software, somehow, to identify the person(s) involved? Are we supposed to somehow issue these warnings ourselves, since the ISP won't technically be able to?

See the problem? Who's responsible for each infraction? Who should be punished? The entire complex, by throttling or at some point terminating our Internet service? Each unit in the complex pays for shared Internet equally as part of our monthly association fees. We're not a business — there's no CEO. The few of us who manage the Internet on behalf of the rest can't act unilaterally to preempt potential infractions by blocking aspects of the service by introducing content filters the way a private company might
.


He also takes the ISP/media union to task for failing to transparently disclose full details of the plan and how it will work.  He says the collaborators decision to force consumers to "reverse-engineer" their rights is a big "transparency issue".

The plan, as he points out, has been temporarily delayed by the CCI as the power outages from Hurricane Sandy set back the MarkMonitor's testing of the scheme on trial partner networks.

But as the delayed system moves forward to rolling out in weeks to come, one has to wonder how many scenarios like the one Mr. Peckham laid out might occur.  If they do, the wrath will likely largely be shouldered by the ISP, and they may find themselves losing paying customers.

And when things reach that point one has to wonder whether the fragile union between the content hording big media and the service providers will be capable of surviving the financial friction.


This new 6 Strikes plan will be the biggest clusterf#%k the internet has ever seen...
The richest man is not he who has the most, but he who needs the least. No good deed goes unpunished...

Image
User avatar
Hammer_Time
Rantmeister Mod
 
Posts: 33794
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, Mordor

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Hammer_Time » Sat Jan 12, 2013 1:15 pm

Also this:

http://stopthecap.com/2012/10/23/six-st ... ry-target/

Network World columnist Steven Vaughan-Nichols worries this is just the beginning of another copyright enforcement overreach:

The name of their game is to monitor your network traffic, with the help of your friendly ISP. Their justification for this is the usual made-up “facts” that content theft leads to “more than 373,000 jobs, $16 billion in lost wages, and $2.6 billion in lost taxes.” Yeah, I’m also sure someone downloading copyrighted porn leads to cats and dogs living together.

One reason I can’t buy into all this is that, as TorrentFreak points out, the Center’s expert who vouches that this all works is none other than Stroz Friedberg, a former RIAA lobbyist. Oh yeah, he doesn’t have bias for paranoid copyright protection companies.

What this means for you is that if your ISP is AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner, or Verizon, they’ll be watching your use of BitTorrent and letting CCI decide if you deserve some warnings, an end to your Internet service, or a full-out lawsuit.

[...] The RIAA, the MPAA, and other copyright “protectors” have never done anything for content creators. They’re all about protecting the businesses stuck with old, broken, pre-digital business models. Even that wouldn’t be so bad, except historically they’ve always vastly over-reacted.

We all know the stories of some poor slob who’s been slammed with tens of thousands of damages for downloading a song. What you may not know is that all the powers that be have to do is to claim something is copyrighted, whether it is or not, and multiple websites can be closed in minutes or your entire digital library can be destroyed.

Does that sound like paranoid fantasy? I wish.

[...] Oh yeah, I feel really sure that the CCI and friends are going to do a good job. Welcome to the new copyright world, same as the old, where you’re always considered guilty rather than that quaint idea of being considered innocent before proven otherwise.


CCI admits sophisticated pirates will probably never get caught by its Copyright Alert System, because most of them are moving to secured Virtual Private Network (VPN) technology that effectively masks their identities. TorrentFreak notes sales for VPN’s are skyrocketing, many headquartered far away from the reach of the United States in exotic, subpoena-proof locations like Cyprus, the Seychelles, Romania, and Ukraine.


The other deep web refers to content that can only be accessed behind an anonymizing wall, using services like Tor – which stands for The Onion Router – to resolve addresses that can’t be addressed by your regular browser. In Tor’s case, these end in .onion instead of .com or .org, and are usually constantly changing so they’re never in one place for too long.

One of these sites is The Hidden Wiki, a directory to all the other ever-changing addresses. Some of this stuff is fairly pedestrian and totally acceptable material. Much of it is not. Proponents claim that The Hidden Wiki, as a directory, is innocent in all of this and is just providing free and open information – but anyone with common sense who takes a look knows that this isn’t just about free speech; the site basically endorses illegal content simply by volume if nothing else.


The Onion Router ( TOR ) :

http://www.instructables.com/id/Go-Onli ... he-Onion-/

Go Online without Getting Snooped: Tor (The Onion Router)

When you go online, you leave tracks all over the place. You could be hanging out with friends on IM, checking out websites, or downloading music. If you live in a country where snoops are prying into what ordinary citizens do online (lke, um, the US) you want a way to cover those tracks.

If you're in school, though, then it's even worse. No matter what country you're in, chances are that your access to the internets is as snooped-on as any police state in the world.

So, how do we escape our little virtual prisons? In this Instructable, I'll tell you about something called Tor (The Onion Router.) I'll tell you how it works, and then offer some simple instructions on how to get your web browser hooked up. No more getting snooped!

Step 1

How Tor Works

An "onion router" is an Internet site that takes requests for web-pages and passes them onto other onion routers, and on to other onion routers, until one of them finally decides to fetch the page and pass it back through the layers of the onion until it reaches you. The traffic to the onion-routers is encrypted, which means that the school can’t see what you’re asking for, and the layers of the onion don’t know who they’re working for. There are millions of nodes—the program was set up by the US Office of Naval Research to help their people get around the censorware in countries like Syria and China, which means that it’s perfectly designed for operating in the confines of an average American high-school.

Tor works because the school has a finite blacklist of naughty addresses we aren’t to visit, and the addresses of the nodes change all the time—no way could the school keep track of them all.


Caveat!!! :

I'm sorry - this is a nice article but I strongly advise against anyone considering doing this. - Using TOR is not as secure as a lot of people think:

The TOR network works by channeling your data through a chain of highly encrypted SSH proxy tunnels, a so called "proxy chain".

If you visit, for example, this link: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=paris+hilton, your request will be encrypted and tunnelled to another TOR user, then another, then another and so on. Your data could be passed around 20 times. The other TOR users cannot see the link you typed in (as it is encrypted). This sounds very very secure.

However, the data has the be decrypted again before google can understand what you searched for. In order to do this, the last TOR user in a proxy chain is called an "exit node". The exit node decrypts the data, contacts google for your results, encrypts the results and sends them back through the chain to you.

Sound secure so far? Well, actually, it does.

But what happens if the exit node runs a packet sniffer (like Wireshark) on their computer to monitor outgoing network connections? The url you typed in appears in plain text on their screen. They don't know who you are, but they saw what you did.

I hear you ask; "So what? - I don't care if a random Ukranian sees that I searched for 'Paris Hilton'." True. Most random Ukranians won't care at all if you searched for Paris Hilton. In fact, they may enjoy calling up the same link you searched for. But what about if you had been reading your hotmail email instead? - They get to see what you typed and to who you sent it.

The problem gets even worse if you start channeling E-Mail and Instant messenger programs through TOR. The POP3 E-Mail protocol sends usernames and passwords in PLAIN TEXT to the mail server. This means, that an exit node could sniff outgoing traffic and steal your email account. - They could then probably go to Paypal.com and request that your password be sent to your registered email address. The would then steal your Paypal information directly from your email account. - Is it sounding very secure now? Bye bye money.

But that isn't all... Some exit nodes act as bridges between you and the website you want to access, altering the data before it is send back to you. e.g. They could change all references to the name, "Paris Hilton" into "Bill Gates". - All of a sudden, you aren't looking at the innocent pictures you intended.

Even worse: It is possible for exit nodes to dynamically swap out SSL certificates of secure websites. If you called up https://www.myreallysecurebank.com over TOR, you might be sent back an SSL certificate which doesn't actually belong to your bank. - This would mean that your login details for your online banking are also visible to the exit node. - Bye bye money, again.

Sorry to rant on, but this should really be known before anyone tries to use the TOR network.

I am not saying TOR is bad - but don't ever consider sending anything personal over it or you might end up with less security than you bargained for.


Tor doesn't claim to solve all your Internet security problems.

It does protect you against determination of your location by the Internet sites you visit, and against traffic analysis -- inspection of your destinations by a person looking at your computer's link.
It can get your communications through a hostile filter or firewall, because it encrypts the links from your computer to the Tor entry node, and at all points between there and the exit (3 hops, if you haven't changed configuration).


So if you decide to use TOR service for torrent downloads ( anonymous and private ), DO NOT use TOR for online banking, shopping, emails, or any other service that requires a password or personal information since the exit node in TOR decodes your data into clear text which others could use maliciously against you.. only use TOR for torrenting is my advice...

December 29, 2012

Laird,
After seeing your post I switched to https://vpnme.com as well from a uk provider. Thanks for the tip.

Your reply made me think a little an I would like to share some thoughts for everyone.
ANY VPN PROVIDER THAT:
has a bandwidth cap IS LOGGING.
does not accept bitcoin should not be trusted.
does not offer a NAT, or Proxy mode is not protecting you.
wants more than an email, password and payment info for signup should not be trusted.
is based in a country with data retention requirements (such as HMA which is required to log) should not be used, and is why I switched to https://vpnme.com after having my eyes opened.

See for yourself:
Current Status: The EU Data Retention Directive (DRD), adopted by the European Union in 2006, is the most prominent example of a mandatory data retention framework.
https://www.eff.org/issues/mandatory-data-retention/eu
Another interesting link:
http://www.informationweek.com/security ... /231602248
Choose carefully your VPN provider and where they are based if you want to protect your privacy.
I went with https://vpnme.com/privacy but make your own decisions and just be fully informed. as the old commercial in the US used to say knowledge is power. Or in this thread knowledge is protection.


Here is a list of VPN services that are torrent-friendly:

http://torrentfreak.com/which-vpn-provi ... ly-111007/
The richest man is not he who has the most, but he who needs the least. No good deed goes unpunished...

Image
User avatar
Hammer_Time
Rantmeister Mod
 
Posts: 33794
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, Mordor

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby DIREWOLF75 » Sat Jan 12, 2013 2:14 pm

But how can one sue for "freeware"?

Ah, you misunderstand...

Sue the ISPs for limiting access, breaking the ISP contract, despite there being NO ILLEGAL FILESHARING happening.
This has been an objective and completely impartial message from the propaganda bureau of DIREWOLF75. Thank you for reading. Have a nice day.
Image
User avatar
DIREWOLF75
X-bit Goon
 
Posts: 15170
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: Isthmus of Baldur (modernly known as Bollnäs), Sweden

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Sauron_Daz » Sun Jan 13, 2013 2:00 am

Can be done only if they actually limit the access..
We never think of us as being one of Them. We are always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.
User avatar
Sauron_Daz
Evil OverLord Mod
 
Posts: 34560
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby DIREWOLF75 » Sun Jan 13, 2013 1:05 pm

Sauron_Daz wrote:Can be done only if they actually limit the access..


If someone does filesharing 24/7 using up all their bandwidth with it, well, that´s exactly what someone needs to test.

If they are looking at filesharing regardless(as that would also include some commercial mediasharing services) or if they are actually tracking well enough to find out individual files...

Also in need of testing, what happens if someone runs fileshare via a proxy...
This has been an objective and completely impartial message from the propaganda bureau of DIREWOLF75. Thank you for reading. Have a nice day.
Image
User avatar
DIREWOLF75
X-bit Goon
 
Posts: 15170
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: Isthmus of Baldur (modernly known as Bollnäs), Sweden

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Sauron_Daz » Mon Jan 14, 2013 2:19 am

I suppose they at least start tracking individual files before throttling someone's connection...
We never think of us as being one of Them. We are always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.
User avatar
Sauron_Daz
Evil OverLord Mod
 
Posts: 34560
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby DIREWOLF75 » Mon Jan 14, 2013 3:34 am

Sauron_Daz wrote:I suppose they at least start tracking individual files before throttling someone's connection...

Yes, but you´re neither an idiot nor a copyright nazi. You would likely set the rules so that at least only those actually guilty would be affected(or try at least).
I have no such hopes for "them".
This has been an objective and completely impartial message from the propaganda bureau of DIREWOLF75. Thank you for reading. Have a nice day.
Image
User avatar
DIREWOLF75
X-bit Goon
 
Posts: 15170
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: Isthmus of Baldur (modernly known as Bollnäs), Sweden

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Sauron_Daz » Mon Jan 14, 2013 4:53 am

They probably only look at the amount of downloads. If its a lot (or close to the limit) they may simply presume you're downloading 'illegal' content.
We never think of us as being one of Them. We are always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.
User avatar
Sauron_Daz
Evil OverLord Mod
 
Posts: 34560
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Celt » Mon Jan 14, 2013 7:43 am

Screw it . . . I am gonna finish that song and release it on file-sharing as freeware . . . (older XBiters will know what i am on about) . . .
You don't have to be a megalomaniac to moderate this forum . . . but it helps!
Image
1123.6536.5321 - More than a number, it's our home!
User avatar
Celt
SpamCrusher Mod
 
Posts: 9714
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: The Land of Concrete Cows

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby DIREWOLF75 » Mon Jan 14, 2013 2:01 pm

Sauron_Daz wrote:They probably only look at the amount of downloads. If its a lot (or close to the limit) they may simply presume you're downloading 'illegal' content.

Exactly. And if they do, THEY are breaking the ISP contract.
This has been an objective and completely impartial message from the propaganda bureau of DIREWOLF75. Thank you for reading. Have a nice day.
Image
User avatar
DIREWOLF75
X-bit Goon
 
Posts: 15170
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: Isthmus of Baldur (modernly known as Bollnäs), Sweden

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Hammer_Time » Mon Jan 14, 2013 3:27 pm

Celt wrote:Screw it . . . I am gonna finish that song and release it on file-sharing as freeware . . . (older XBiters will know what i am on about) . . .


Do it! :D
The richest man is not he who has the most, but he who needs the least. No good deed goes unpunished...

Image
User avatar
Hammer_Time
Rantmeister Mod
 
Posts: 33794
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, Mordor

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Sauron_Daz » Tue Jan 15, 2013 12:25 am

DIREWOLF75 wrote:
Sauron_Daz wrote:They probably only look at the amount of downloads. If its a lot (or close to the limit) they may simply presume you're downloading 'illegal' content.

Exactly. And if they do, THEY are breaking the ISP contract.


Any volunteers to try this??
We never think of us as being one of Them. We are always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.
User avatar
Sauron_Daz
Evil OverLord Mod
 
Posts: 34560
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Hammer_Time » Thu Feb 28, 2013 1:30 am

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013 ... -like/#p3n

Here’s what an actual “Six Strikes” copyright alert looks like
Ars asks and Comcast obliges, giving us copies of Alerts 1, 2, 4 and 5.


We don't have this policy here just yet in Canada, but I am sure it is forthcoming! :fist: :cry:
The richest man is not he who has the most, but he who needs the least. No good deed goes unpunished...

Image
User avatar
Hammer_Time
Rantmeister Mod
 
Posts: 33794
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm
Location: Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, Mordor

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby Sauron_Daz » Thu Feb 28, 2013 6:26 am

:(
We never think of us as being one of Them. We are always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.
User avatar
Sauron_Daz
Evil OverLord Mod
 
Posts: 34560
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 4:00 pm

Re: How Verizon's 'Six Strikes' Plan Works

Postby rteams56 » Fri Mar 01, 2013 7:11 pm

This is exactly why I use a non logging VPN. It keeps my ISP from seeing anything I am doing.
I do not like the idea of my ISP sniffing my traffic to see if I am doing something wrong. This seems like illegal search to me.

As I recall I believe many a search warrant were declined as the agency requesting was "just going on a fishing expedition to see what they could find" and now we have our ISP's doing this without warrants just because? WHT.

I would suggest that everyone VPN's up.

Personally I use VPNme.com ( no logging ) But I would suggest everyone use something now. The internet is no longer a safe place.

RT
rteams56
New Member
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Mar 01, 2013 7:04 pm

Next

Return to Breaking Technology News

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests