Mark of the Beast

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Mark of the Beast

Postby Hammer_Time » Wed Nov 21, 2012 4:06 am

http://www.infowars.com/student-expelle ... fid-badge/

Student Expelled for Refusing Location Tracking RFID Badge

School makes good on threat of ‘consequences’ for refusing to submit to ‘Mark of the Beast’ ID scheme


Aaron Dykes
Infowars.com
November 19, 2012

After months of protesting a policy requiring high school students to wear an RFID-enabled ID badge around their necks at all times, Andrea Hernandez is being involuntarily withdrawn from John Jay High School in San Antonio effective November 26th, according to a letter sent by the district that has now been made public.

The letter, sent on November 13, informs her father that the Smart ID program, which was phased in with the new school year, is now in “full implementation” and requires all students to comply by wearing the location-tracking badges.
Since Andrea Hernandez has refused to wear the badge, she is being withdrawn from the magnet school and her program at the Science and Engineering Academy, and instead will have to attend William Howard Taft HS, which is not currently involved in the ID scheme, unless she changes her position.

Civil liberties lawyers at the Rutherford Institute told Infowars.com that they are in the process of filing a temporary restraining order petition to prevent the school from kicking Hernandez out until further appeals can be made to resolve the matter. Representatives for John Jay did not return calls for comment by the time of publishing.

Andrea, backed by her family, has claimed the policy violates her religious beliefs and unduly infringes on her privacy. The controversial ID badge includes the photo and name of each student, a barcode tied to the student’s social security number, as well as an RFID chip which pinpoints the exact location of the individual student, including after hours and when the student leaves campus.
The battle over the IDs has been an ongoing saga. The Hernandez family has previously attended several school board meetings, organized protests and filed formal grievances with the district over the matter, and has been backed by numerous civil rights advocates.
Infowars reporters covered a protest that took place in early October, following up with appearances by the Hernandez family on the Alex Jones Show and the Infowars Nightly News programs.


In response to public outcry and pressure from rights groups, the school has offered to remove the battery and chip, but wouldn’t budge on mandating the ID. Their offer would also require the Hernandez family to end their criticism and agree to comply with and even tout the policy, something Andrea’s father Steve Hernandez finds unacceptable.
Steve Hernandez stated, “[A]s part of the accommodation my daughter and I would have to agree to stop criticizing the program and publicly support … it. I told [the Deputy Superintendent] that was unacceptable because it would imply an endorsement of the district’s policy and my daughter and I should not have to give up our constitutional rights to speak out against a program that we feel is wrong.”
Andrea has instead agreed to carry her original ID card, which was issued when she began at the school, and was told would be valid for her entire four years there.
But she has already been effectively punished for her non-compliance. She was not allowed to vote for Homecoming King & Queen because she didn’t have the proper identification, and has also been barred from some school functions. The school originally threatened to suspend, fine, or involuntarily transfer students who wouldn’t wear the ID once the program was fully instituted.
Deputy Superintendent Ray Galindo vowed in October that the consequences would be worse if Andrea did not change her mind: “I urge you to accept this solution so that your child’s instructional program will not be affected. As we discussed, there will be consequences for refusal to wear an ID card as we begin to move forward with full implementation,” Galindo wrote.

Hernandez’ case first made news back in August, when the school tried to impose the new technology at the start of the school year. John Jay HS, along with other participating schools, stands to receive $2 million dollars in state funding for a program supposedly instituted to reduce tardiness and truancy. However, Hernandez and other students only qualified for the magnet school by having good attendance, grades and test scores in the first place.

For many Christian families, including the Hernandez’, the mandatory policy is eerily close to the predictions of Revelations 13: 16-18, which warns of the Mark of the Beast:

16 He causes all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hand or on their foreheads, 17 and that no one may buy or sell except one who has the mark or[a] the name of the beast, or the number of his name. 18 Here is wisdom. Let him who has understanding calculate the number of the beast, for it is the number of a man: His number is 666. (New King James Version)


As such, the policy has also been considered a violation of the First Amendment to the Constitution, which guarantees the right to free speech and freedom of religion. Many also consider it to be an unreasonable and unwarranted violation of privacy, protected under the Fourth Amendment.

Gov’t Bribing School Children with Candy to Wear RFID Chip:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... iBHwzvXBM8


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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnet_school

They lie and say the reason for the ID badge is to "reduce truancy", but these students have already proven they get good grades and therefore good attendance in order to GET INTO THE DAMN MAGNET SCHOOL IN THE FIRST PLACE!!! Hypocrites!!!! :roll: :fist: :evil:

So with this already happening in high schools, the next obvious step is to embed "The Mark of the Beast" under the skin of your palm at birth, a single "ID" RFID chip that handles all your transactions and tracks your location.. the convenience will be emphasized ( swipe your palm for all transactions wirelessly, never lose stupid plastic cards again ) but the real purpose behind this NWO scheme will be to control the masses. If you dare to speak out or "disobey" then the gov't just cuts you off from society completely by freezing your accounts, and using the RFID chip in your palm to locate and throw you in jail... don't believe me? Its coming...this is just a taste of it right now...

A student rightfully refuses to wear an RFID tracking chip around her neck at all times so her high school expels her... take this "model" to the next level and you have the scenario I described above... the mark of the beast... :evil: I sure as hell would never submit to this kind of invasion of privacy and rights myself...

Where did we see this level of oppression and violation of human rights before?? Ah yes, Communist China and old Russia... however the New World Order is going to take this to a whole new level... the 1% need absolute control over the 99% in order for them not to organize and rise up against them, and this is one of the ways they intend to do it...

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What is wrong with America:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6TlQbuL ... ure=fvwrel

Great Ron Paul speeches:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V36MT5lAMrc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWpICzxteMk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hJTisovvjc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-ruoJ5c5Mk

The Facebook Scheme:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NazEjEcYdnQ
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Sauron_Daz » Wed Nov 21, 2012 6:27 am

I will never ever accept such a device.
Who in his right mind would?
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby clone » Wed Nov 21, 2012 7:54 am

my favorite part is the justification for using them.

they have to wear the badges in an effort to reduce truancy and tardiness..... ok so if a student doesn't show up for class are they claiming they wouldn't know?

if a student is late for class are they claiming they wouldn't know?

it's called attendance.

that only one student is fighting this is the saddest part.... and the student will lose because it's a private school.
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby DIREWOLF75 » Wed Nov 21, 2012 7:55 am

Andrea has instead agreed to carry her original ID card, which was issued when she began at the school, and was told would be valid for her entire four years there.

And that, means the school is, or rather SHOULD be 100% busted. They broke their word.



Aside from that, i feel like looking the school up and send some hatemail or something... Or something.
Oh right, i´ll put the link on the talkpage for the school on wiki. :mrgreen:
Behind the scenes insidious, suits me.
This has been an objective and completely impartial message from the propaganda bureau of DIREWOLF75. Thank you for reading. Have a nice day.
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Hammer_Time » Wed Nov 21, 2012 10:04 am

clone wrote:my favorite part is the justification for using them.

they have to wear the badges in an effort to reduce truancy and tardiness..... ok so if a student doesn't show up for class are they claiming they wouldn't know?

if a student is late for class are they claiming they wouldn't know?

it's called attendance.

that only one student is fighting this is the saddest part.... and the student will lose because it's a private school.


No kidding, and the hypocritical part is that these "magnet schools" ( magnet for "smart" kids ) are schools that only accept those with very good grades and attendance in the first place, the very same "cream of the crop" students that are LEAST likely to be tardy or absent!!

Also notice they are doing this trial in Texas, home of rednecks and George W. Bush... where the Texas school system is a leader in revising history in their textbooks, leaving out important details about when America did evil things, such as watering down the civil war, overemphasizing Christopher Columbus ( America was "discovered" a thousand years before Columbus from DNA evidence of european skeletons found recently in America - they had heroin in their DNA which could only have come from the Middle East at the time where the poppy plant natively grows, and also cocaine in their DNA samples ( well preserved skeletons ), something that had to come from South America where the coca plant natively grows, not in America, etc etc ) plus there are older viking remains also found waaay before Columbus came to kill off the native Indians for their gold, or cut their hands off for "stealing" their own gold by hiding it from the Spanish, removing the words "Imperialism" and "Capitalism" from textbooks, and generally revising history to make "America" more "American" and brainwash the young with pure propaganda...turn em into slaves early... obey.. is it any surprise that Texas is the first state to trial this "mandatory photo ID RFID tracking system"??? It is because it has the best chance of succeeding there, once the model is established, then they can migrate it to other states and finally the public school system ( non-Magnet schools ) for total control of every child in the school system in Amerika... disgusting...

This is not what the founding fathers envisioned for America... she is ruled by evil now, terrorists who argue war is peace, and approve torture and promote racism and hate, and a "I am gonna hit you before you attack me" mindset, and "I've got mine, screw you!!" attitude...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQx_2j5nXuc

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/03/1 ... 96831.html

The new "concentration camps" AKA FEMA Camps are now ready to receive citizens/prisoners:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5TdstVdrEE
The richest man is not he who has the most, but he who needs the least. No good deed goes unpunished...

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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Hammer_Time » Wed Nov 21, 2012 10:12 am

DIREWOLF75 wrote:
Andrea has instead agreed to carry her original ID card, which was issued when she began at the school, and was told would be valid for her entire four years there.

And that, means the school is, or rather SHOULD be 100% busted. They broke their word.



Aside from that, i feel like looking the school up and send some hatemail or something... Or something.
Oh right, i´ll put the link on the talkpage for the school on wiki. :mrgreen:
Behind the scenes insidious, suits me.


True that, and go for it!! :D
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Sauron_Daz » Wed Nov 21, 2012 2:39 pm

clone wrote:that only one student is fighting this is the saddest part....

Indeed!
We never think of us as being one of Them. We are always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Sauron_Daz » Wed Nov 21, 2012 2:56 pm

DIREWOLF75 wrote:
Andrea has instead agreed to carry her original ID card, which was issued when she began at the school, and was told would be valid for her entire four years there.

And that, means the school is, or rather SHOULD be 100% busted. They broke their word.



Aside from that, i feel like looking the school up and send some hatemail or something... Or something.
Oh right, i´ll put the link on the talkpage for the school on wiki. :mrgreen:
Behind the scenes insidious, suits me.


:lol:
We never think of us as being one of Them. We are always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Hammer_Time » Wed Nov 21, 2012 6:13 pm

Sauron_Daz wrote:
clone wrote:that only one student is fighting this is the saddest part....

Indeed!


Shows you how "cowed" the other students/families are already, they don't want their kid kicked out of their precious "magnet school" so they just obey, as they are programmed and brainwashed to do these days...

Yes only one has the balls ( or ovaries in this case :wink: ) to fight this, and mostly because her father is an activist and knows how "wrong" this whole scheme is from start to finish... even with the battery/RFID tracking removed from the badge, the "Photo ID" badge concept is ridiculous itself!! ... We are not talking about NASA here or a secret Gov't lab needing that level of security... this is a HIGH SCHOOL and those are human beings attending, not robots or numbers...although the Bilderberger Group is trying very hard to change this of course...
The richest man is not he who has the most, but he who needs the least. No good deed goes unpunished...

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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Hammer_Time » Wed Nov 21, 2012 9:51 pm

But of course!! :

http://www.globalresearch.ca/california ... ce/5312584

California Gets Face Scanners To Spy On Everyone At Once

By Russia Today
Global Research, November 22, 2012

In a single second, law enforcement agents can match a suspect against millions upon millions of profiles in vast detailed databases stored on the cloud. It’s all done using facial recognition, and in Southern California it’s already occurring.

Imagine the police taking a picture: any picture of a person, anywhere, and matching it on the spot in less than a second to a personalized profile, scanning millions upon millions of entries from within vast, intricate databases stored on the cloud.

It’s done with state of the art facial recognition technology, and in Southern California it’s already happening.

At least one law enforcement agency in San Diego is currently using software developed by FaceFirst, a division of nearby Camarillo, California’s Airborne Biometrics Group. It can positively identify anyone, as long as physical data about a person’s facial features is stored somewhere the police can access. Though that pool of potential matches could include millions, the company says that by using the “best available facial recognition algorithms” they can scour that data set in a fraction of a second in order to send authorities all known intelligence about anyone who enters a camera’s field of vision.

“Live high definition video enables FaceFirst to track and isolate the face of every person on every camera simultaneously,” the company claims on their website.

“Up to 4 million comparisons per second, per clustered server” — that’s how many matches a single computer wired to the FaceFirst system can consider in a single breath as images captured by cameras, cell phones and surveillance devices from as far as 100 feet away are fed into algorithms designed to pick out terrorists and persons of interest. In a single setting, an unlimited amount of cameras can record the movements of a crowd at 30-frames-per-second, pick out each and every face and then feed it into an equation that, ideally, finds the bad guys.

“I realized that with the right technology, we could have saved lives,” Joseph Rosenkrantz, president and CEO of FaceFirst, tells the Los Angeles Times. He says he dreamed up the project after the attacks of September 11, 2001 and has since invested years into perfecting it. Not yet mastered, however, is how to make sure innocent bystanders and anyone who wishes to stay anonymous is left alone as he expands an Orwellian infrastructure that allows anyone with the right credentials to comb through a crowd and learn facts and figures of any individual within the scope of a surveillance cam.

Speaking to reporters with Find Biometrics in August, Rosenkrantz said that the system is already in place in Panama, where computers there process nearly 20 million comparisons per second “using a FaceFirst matching cluster with a large number of live surveillance cameras on a scale beyond any other system ever implemented.”

“Within just a couple of seconds whoever needs to know receives an email containing all the evidence and stats about the person identified along with the video clip of them passing the camera so they may be approached then and there,” he says.

Earlier this year, RT broke the story of TrapWire, a surveillance system marketed by global intelligence firm Stratfor to law enforcement agencies across the world. Through investigation of TrapWire and its parent companies, it became apparent that surveillance devices linked to the system could be monitored from remote fusion centers with access to an endless array of cameras and databases. According to FaceFirst’s developers, their technology doesn’t need a second person to scour video feeds to find suspected terrorists. Complex algorithms instead make finding a match the job of a computer and positive IDs can be returned in under a second.

“It doesn’t do me any good if I’m able to look at a face with a camera and five minutes later, there’s a match,” says Paul Benne, a security consultant who tells the Los Angeles Times that he recommended his clients use FaceFirst in high-security areas. “By then, the person’s gone.”

Rosenkrantz admits in his interview to the use of the technology at Panama’s Tocumen airport, as well as other border crossings along the perimeter of the country. The deployment of FaceFirst in the United States still begs questions concerning the relationship between security and privacy, though, and is likely to remain an issue of contention until agencies in San Diego and elsewhere explain what exactly they’re up to.

According to a report in Southern California’s News 10 published this week, an unnamed law enforcement agency in San Diego County has been testing a handheld version of FacecFirst for about five months now. On the record, though, no agency in the US has been forthcoming with why it’s using those specific facial scanners or even confirming it’s in their arsenal of ever expanding surveillance tools.

“If they spot someone who doesn’t have identification, they can take their picture with their phone and immediately get a result,” Joseph Saad, business development director for FaceFirst, tells News 10.

Saad says his company predicts that “facial recognition will be in every day society” soon, perhaps before many Americans want to admit. According to filings available online, Airborne Biometrics was already cleared by the Government Services Administration (GSA) last year to have FaceFirst sold to any federal agency in the country.

“The ability to apply our technology for the advancement of our country has always been my number one goal,” Rosenkrantz said in April 2011 when Airborne was awarded an IT 70 Schedule contract for FaceFirst by the GSA. Because that contact has since been signed with Uncle Sam, Rosenfratz and company can see that goal through, at least until its up for renewal in 2017, through a deal that lets them sell FaceFirst to “all federal agencies and other specified activities and agencies.”

In a demonstration video on the FaceFirst website, the company touts their product as being a great addition to any acquisition device, specifically suggesting that clients consider integrating the software with tactical robots, mobile phones and surveillance drones. Coincidently, just last month the sheriff of Alameda County, California asked the US Homeland Security department for as much as $100,000 in order to have an unmanned aerial vehicles — a drone — in his agency’s arsenal for the sake of protecting the security of his citizens.

Weeks earlier, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano told congressional lawmakers that she endorses the idea of sending drones to California to aid with law enforcement efforts. Pleads like the one out of Alameda have been occurring across the country in a rate considered alarming by privacy advocates, but rarely has that opposition brought into the spotlight the scary surveillance capabilities that any police agency may soon have in their hands. While the issues of Fourth Amendment erosions and privacy violations have indeed emerged, the actual abilities of surveillance devices — snagging faces from large crowds in milliseconds and sending info to the authorities — have not.

“Facial characteristics become biometric templates compared against multiple watch lists created from customer photos or massive criminal databases,” the promo explains. Those lists can be custom created by law enforcement agencies to track a ‘most-wanted’ roster of suspected criminals but can pull from databases where any biometric information is already available or can be inputted on the fly.

Discovery of San Diego’s use of FaceFirst comes just two months after the FBI announced it had already rolled out a program to upgrade its current Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) that keeps track of citizens with criminal records across the country with one that relies on face recognition. The FBI expects the Next Generation Identification (NGI) program will include as many as 14 million photographs by the time the project is in full swing in just two years, relying on digital images already stored on federal databases, such as the ones managed by state motor vehicle departments. In the state of New Jersey, the DMV has recently told drivers that they are not allowed to smile for driver’s license photos because it could cause complications in terms of logging biometric data in their own facial recognition system.

The FBI said that, by rolling out NGI, they “will be able to provide services to enhance interoperability between stakeholders at all levels of government, including local, state, federal and international partners.” The unnamed San Diego law enforcement agency already with the ability to match millions of faces in a single moment may be relying right now on that connectedness to keep track of anyone they wish.

According to an article in the Los Angeles Times last week, 70 percent of biometrics spending comes from law enforcement, the military and the government. The private sector is scooping up that scanning power too, though, with FaceFirst having already cut deals with Samsung to provide them with technology for use in closed-circuit surveillance cameras marketed to businesses. But while the Federal Trade Commission has informed companies and corporations that they need to be more transparent about how personally identifiable information is stored on their servers, the Times notes that no guidelines like that exist for law enforcement agencies, who may very well sit on mounds of intelligence without good reason.

“You don’t need a warrant to use this technology on someone,” Sen. Al Franken (D-Minnesota) said last year during a congressional hearing about the use of expanding surveillance technology. “You might not even need to have a reasonable suspicion that they’re involved in a crime.”

Aside from FaceFirst, law enforcement is using that excuse to pull data on persons — of interest and otherwise — even when their faces are protected. As RT reported recently, an ever-growing number of police departments are investing in license plate scanners that let officers identify as many as 10,000 vehicles and their registered owners in a single shift. Much like how FaceFirst can pick out dozens of suspects from a single photograph and send data to custom servers, those license plate readers can pick up the precise location of persons never suspected of a crime, making rampant invasion of privacy just collateral damage as the surveillance monster state grows larger

“The cameras will catch things you didn’t see, cars you wouldn’t have run, and the beauty of it is that it runs everything,” Lieutenant Christopher Morgon of the Long Beach, California Police Department says in promotional material for an automated license plate recognition device manufactured by PIPS Technology.

The Federal Trade Commission has offered the security industry best practice suggestions about how long to hold onto data picked up by surveillance cameras, but safeguards for law enforcement agencies are largely absent. In the case of the scanners used to find license plates on the streets of Southern California, Jon Campbell of LA Weekly writes, “The location and photo information is uploaded to a central database, then retained for years — in case it’s needed for a subsequent investigation.”

Rosenkrantz says FaceFirst is experiencing triple digit growth in 2012 and expects sustainable expansion to continue throughout the next five years. By 2020, the Federal Aviation Administration expects that as many as 30,000 drones will be operating in US airspace.


Wonderful... and all those Americans who think it is "cool" that the US Air Force routinely kills civilians with drones in Pakistan, will most likely change their minds once these expected 30,000 drones are flying over US Airspace killing US citizens ( oops, collateral damage, sorry about that!! ) just like they do over in the M.E. right now...

What interesting times we live in... :roll:
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Sauron_Daz » Fri Nov 23, 2012 1:09 am

Hammer_Time wrote:
Sauron_Daz wrote:
clone wrote:that only one student is fighting this is the saddest part....

Indeed!


Shows you how "cowed" the other students/families are already, they don't want their kid kicked out of their precious "magnet school" so they just obey, as they are programmed and brainwashed to do these days...

Yes only one has the balls ( or ovaries in this case :wink: ) to fight this, and mostly because her father is an activist and knows how "wrong" this whole scheme is from start to finish... even with the battery/RFID tracking removed from the badge, the "Photo ID" badge concept is ridiculous itself!! ... We are not talking about NASA here or a secret Gov't lab needing that level of security... this is a HIGH SCHOOL and those are human beings attending, not robots or numbers...although the Bilderberger Group is trying very hard to change this of course...


Schools are there to prepare the kids for the future.
Sowe got a glimpse of the future here.
We never think of us as being one of Them. We are always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Sauron_Daz » Fri Nov 23, 2012 1:12 am

Hammer_Time wrote:But of course!! :

http://www.globalresearch.ca/california ... ce/5312584

California Gets Face Scanners To Spy On Everyone At Once

By Russia Today
Global Research, November 22, 2012

In a single second, law enforcement agents can match a suspect against millions upon millions of profiles in vast detailed databases stored on the cloud. It’s all done using facial recognition, and in Southern California it’s already occurring.

Imagine the police taking a picture: any picture of a person, anywhere, and matching it on the spot in less than a second to a personalized profile, scanning millions upon millions of entries from within vast, intricate databases stored on the cloud.

It’s done with state of the art facial recognition technology, and in Southern California it’s already happening.

At least one law enforcement agency in San Diego is currently using software developed by FaceFirst, a division of nearby Camarillo, California’s Airborne Biometrics Group. It can positively identify anyone, as long as physical data about a person’s facial features is stored somewhere the police can access. Though that pool of potential matches could include millions, the company says that by using the “best available facial recognition algorithms” they can scour that data set in a fraction of a second in order to send authorities all known intelligence about anyone who enters a camera’s field of vision.

“Live high definition video enables FaceFirst to track and isolate the face of every person on every camera simultaneously,” the company claims on their website.

“Up to 4 million comparisons per second, per clustered server” — that’s how many matches a single computer wired to the FaceFirst system can consider in a single breath as images captured by cameras, cell phones and surveillance devices from as far as 100 feet away are fed into algorithms designed to pick out terrorists and persons of interest. In a single setting, an unlimited amount of cameras can record the movements of a crowd at 30-frames-per-second, pick out each and every face and then feed it into an equation that, ideally, finds the bad guys.

“I realized that with the right technology, we could have saved lives,” Joseph Rosenkrantz, president and CEO of FaceFirst, tells the Los Angeles Times. He says he dreamed up the project after the attacks of September 11, 2001 and has since invested years into perfecting it. Not yet mastered, however, is how to make sure innocent bystanders and anyone who wishes to stay anonymous is left alone as he expands an Orwellian infrastructure that allows anyone with the right credentials to comb through a crowd and learn facts and figures of any individual within the scope of a surveillance cam.

Speaking to reporters with Find Biometrics in August, Rosenkrantz said that the system is already in place in Panama, where computers there process nearly 20 million comparisons per second “using a FaceFirst matching cluster with a large number of live surveillance cameras on a scale beyond any other system ever implemented.”

“Within just a couple of seconds whoever needs to know receives an email containing all the evidence and stats about the person identified along with the video clip of them passing the camera so they may be approached then and there,” he says.

Earlier this year, RT broke the story of TrapWire, a surveillance system marketed by global intelligence firm Stratfor to law enforcement agencies across the world. Through investigation of TrapWire and its parent companies, it became apparent that surveillance devices linked to the system could be monitored from remote fusion centers with access to an endless array of cameras and databases. According to FaceFirst’s developers, their technology doesn’t need a second person to scour video feeds to find suspected terrorists. Complex algorithms instead make finding a match the job of a computer and positive IDs can be returned in under a second.

“It doesn’t do me any good if I’m able to look at a face with a camera and five minutes later, there’s a match,” says Paul Benne, a security consultant who tells the Los Angeles Times that he recommended his clients use FaceFirst in high-security areas. “By then, the person’s gone.”

Rosenkrantz admits in his interview to the use of the technology at Panama’s Tocumen airport, as well as other border crossings along the perimeter of the country. The deployment of FaceFirst in the United States still begs questions concerning the relationship between security and privacy, though, and is likely to remain an issue of contention until agencies in San Diego and elsewhere explain what exactly they’re up to.

According to a report in Southern California’s News 10 published this week, an unnamed law enforcement agency in San Diego County has been testing a handheld version of FacecFirst for about five months now. On the record, though, no agency in the US has been forthcoming with why it’s using those specific facial scanners or even confirming it’s in their arsenal of ever expanding surveillance tools.

“If they spot someone who doesn’t have identification, they can take their picture with their phone and immediately get a result,” Joseph Saad, business development director for FaceFirst, tells News 10.

Saad says his company predicts that “facial recognition will be in every day society” soon, perhaps before many Americans want to admit. According to filings available online, Airborne Biometrics was already cleared by the Government Services Administration (GSA) last year to have FaceFirst sold to any federal agency in the country.

“The ability to apply our technology for the advancement of our country has always been my number one goal,” Rosenkrantz said in April 2011 when Airborne was awarded an IT 70 Schedule contract for FaceFirst by the GSA. Because that contact has since been signed with Uncle Sam, Rosenfratz and company can see that goal through, at least until its up for renewal in 2017, through a deal that lets them sell FaceFirst to “all federal agencies and other specified activities and agencies.”

In a demonstration video on the FaceFirst website, the company touts their product as being a great addition to any acquisition device, specifically suggesting that clients consider integrating the software with tactical robots, mobile phones and surveillance drones. Coincidently, just last month the sheriff of Alameda County, California asked the US Homeland Security department for as much as $100,000 in order to have an unmanned aerial vehicles — a drone — in his agency’s arsenal for the sake of protecting the security of his citizens.

Weeks earlier, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano told congressional lawmakers that she endorses the idea of sending drones to California to aid with law enforcement efforts. Pleads like the one out of Alameda have been occurring across the country in a rate considered alarming by privacy advocates, but rarely has that opposition brought into the spotlight the scary surveillance capabilities that any police agency may soon have in their hands. While the issues of Fourth Amendment erosions and privacy violations have indeed emerged, the actual abilities of surveillance devices — snagging faces from large crowds in milliseconds and sending info to the authorities — have not.

“Facial characteristics become biometric templates compared against multiple watch lists created from customer photos or massive criminal databases,” the promo explains. Those lists can be custom created by law enforcement agencies to track a ‘most-wanted’ roster of suspected criminals but can pull from databases where any biometric information is already available or can be inputted on the fly.

Discovery of San Diego’s use of FaceFirst comes just two months after the FBI announced it had already rolled out a program to upgrade its current Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) that keeps track of citizens with criminal records across the country with one that relies on face recognition. The FBI expects the Next Generation Identification (NGI) program will include as many as 14 million photographs by the time the project is in full swing in just two years, relying on digital images already stored on federal databases, such as the ones managed by state motor vehicle departments. In the state of New Jersey, the DMV has recently told drivers that they are not allowed to smile for driver’s license photos because it could cause complications in terms of logging biometric data in their own facial recognition system.

The FBI said that, by rolling out NGI, they “will be able to provide services to enhance interoperability between stakeholders at all levels of government, including local, state, federal and international partners.” The unnamed San Diego law enforcement agency already with the ability to match millions of faces in a single moment may be relying right now on that connectedness to keep track of anyone they wish.

According to an article in the Los Angeles Times last week, 70 percent of biometrics spending comes from law enforcement, the military and the government. The private sector is scooping up that scanning power too, though, with FaceFirst having already cut deals with Samsung to provide them with technology for use in closed-circuit surveillance cameras marketed to businesses. But while the Federal Trade Commission has informed companies and corporations that they need to be more transparent about how personally identifiable information is stored on their servers, the Times notes that no guidelines like that exist for law enforcement agencies, who may very well sit on mounds of intelligence without good reason.

“You don’t need a warrant to use this technology on someone,” Sen. Al Franken (D-Minnesota) said last year during a congressional hearing about the use of expanding surveillance technology. “You might not even need to have a reasonable suspicion that they’re involved in a crime.”

Aside from FaceFirst, law enforcement is using that excuse to pull data on persons — of interest and otherwise — even when their faces are protected. As RT reported recently, an ever-growing number of police departments are investing in license plate scanners that let officers identify as many as 10,000 vehicles and their registered owners in a single shift. Much like how FaceFirst can pick out dozens of suspects from a single photograph and send data to custom servers, those license plate readers can pick up the precise location of persons never suspected of a crime, making rampant invasion of privacy just collateral damage as the surveillance monster state grows larger

“The cameras will catch things you didn’t see, cars you wouldn’t have run, and the beauty of it is that it runs everything,” Lieutenant Christopher Morgon of the Long Beach, California Police Department says in promotional material for an automated license plate recognition device manufactured by PIPS Technology.

The Federal Trade Commission has offered the security industry best practice suggestions about how long to hold onto data picked up by surveillance cameras, but safeguards for law enforcement agencies are largely absent. In the case of the scanners used to find license plates on the streets of Southern California, Jon Campbell of LA Weekly writes, “The location and photo information is uploaded to a central database, then retained for years — in case it’s needed for a subsequent investigation.”

Rosenkrantz says FaceFirst is experiencing triple digit growth in 2012 and expects sustainable expansion to continue throughout the next five years. By 2020, the Federal Aviation Administration expects that as many as 30,000 drones will be operating in US airspace.


Wonderful... and all those Americans who think it is "cool" that the US Air Force routinely kills civilians with drones in Pakistan, will most likely change their minds once these expected 30,000 drones are flying over US Airspace killing US citizens ( oops, collateral damage, sorry about that!! ) just like they do over in the M.E. right now...

What interesting times we live in... :roll:


We are all suspects apparently..
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Hammer_Time » Tue Nov 27, 2012 2:31 pm

A good tool to have for the upcoming Apocalypse:

http://www.gizmag.com/leatherman-raptor-shears/25184/

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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Hammer_Time » Thu Nov 29, 2012 12:39 am

This news is horrible:

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/11 ... e-upgrade/

Pentagon Cries Poor, Starts $10 Billion Nuclear Weapon Upgrade


But imagine how much worse military spending would be if RMoney got elected!! :shock: :roll:

Whats another $10 billion when you are already $16 trillion in debt right??!! :whistle:

http://www.usdebtclock.org/
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Celt » Thu Nov 29, 2012 1:28 am

Unfortunately Nukes have to be serviced regularly to keep them useable . . . the biggest problem is Helium-3 contamination caused by the decay of Tritium - He3 is a Neutron absorber, so it actually reduces the effectiveness of the weapon . . . there are ways of limiting He3 contamination in the device, but at some point the Tritium needs to be purged and refreshed.

They are, unfortunately rather high-maintenance things to have . . . unless you plan to use them pretty quickly :evil:

I really need to look over my shoulder just in case the Iranians or NKs try to kidnap me . . .
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby clone » Thu Nov 29, 2012 8:48 am

But imagine how much worse military spending would be if RMoney got elected!
I believe the election proved that Mitt Romney and Obama were two sides of the same coin with both answering many topics with "I'd have done it sooner" instead of "I'd have done it differently".

history has proven this case as well not just with Obama but certainly most obvious with Obama given the U.S. is still in Afghanistan, defense spending didn't move under Obama so far, that offshore prison is still up and running, American privacy rights are being run over roughshod under Obama.

aside from quasi nationalizing Health Care following Mitt Romney's example in that case Obama hasn't really done much differently than what George did..... although their has been a lot of talk about fixing the tax code even under the Democratic majority where they could have done anything.... instead they did next to nothing and covered it up by claiming they had a hard time getting health care through.... which was stupid given they had a majority of both houses, their was no resistance to be worried about.
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Hammer_Time » Thu Nov 29, 2012 12:53 pm

Celt wrote:Unfortunately Nukes have to be serviced regularly to keep them useable . . . the biggest problem is Helium-3 contamination caused by the decay of Tritium - He3 is a Neutron absorber, so it actually reduces the effectiveness of the weapon . . . there are ways of limiting He3 contamination in the device, but at some point the Tritium needs to be purged and refreshed.

They are, unfortunately rather high-maintenance things to have . . . unless you plan to use them pretty quickly :evil:

I really need to look over my shoulder just in case the Iranians or NKs try to kidnap me . . .


Yes, but the cost to simply "service" them would only be about $1 to 2 billion as the article stated... it is costing 10 times that amount because they are UPGRADING them, removing their parachutes in the ass end, and replacing them with guided system so they can guide them to target like a cruise missile, and add a delay for detonation so the delivery vehicle/aircraft has time to get safely away before it goes off, very expensive to do this!!

One reason why: the mod 12 project — even though it’s billed as a “life extension program” — isn’t just about replacing the components of the weapons that are decaying or corroding. (Independent experts say that would take a mere billion or two.) When you swap out the B61?s parachute for satellite-guided tail fin assembly, it introduces a new complication, Lewis adds. “An atomic bomb dropped without a parachute will explode before the airplane is safely away. That means [the federal government] must also redesign much of the packaging and components to survive ‘laydown’ — i.e., thudding into the ground and then exploding a few moments later.” An internal Pentagon audit showed 15 of the 29 planned changes for mod 12 are still technologically immature.


So is the "upgrade" really necessary, especially in these tough economic times??? Imagine if they only spent around $1 billion just "servicing" these nukes and not upgrading them, and putting that other $9 billion into, well I dunno, rebuilding after Sandy, or education, or roads/infrastructure, or money for Vets assistance/programs/hospitals back home in the USA, etc etc. ???

Damn chickenhawks and warmongerers are way out of control these days, and nothing can stop them now, only the complete collapse of the American ( which is now the global obviously ) financial system crashes one day...which it will since you cannot keep up this exponential spending and ignoring of the massive debt forever... the elite already know this, so are squeezing every last drop they possibly can before the collapse, and they are preparing for the coming apocalypse by buying up old military bases/missile sites etc and converting them to underground survival shelters ( as are other intelligent "common folk with the means to do so" ) to survive what is coming...
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Hammer_Time » Thu Nov 29, 2012 1:02 pm

clone wrote:
But imagine how much worse military spending would be if RMoney got elected!
I believe the election proved that Mitt Romney and Obama were two sides of the same coin with both answering many topics with "I'd have done it sooner" instead of "I'd have done it differently".

history has proven this case as well not just with Obama but certainly most obvious with Obama given the U.S. is still in Afghanistan, defense spending didn't move under Obama so far, that offshore prison is still up and running, American privacy rights are being run over roughshod under Obama.

aside from quasi nationalizing Health Care following Mitt Romney's example in that case Obama hasn't really done much differently than what George did..... although their has been a lot of talk about fixing the tax code even under the Democratic majority where they could have done anything.... instead they did next to nothing and covered it up by claiming they had a hard time getting health care through.... which was stupid given they had a majority of both houses, their was no resistance to be worried about.


True, and I agree with you... I think RMoney would have simply "sped up the NWO agenda" though, Obama just does it a slower pace and is better able to "connect" to the American people with his amazing oratory skills... the next year in office will be very telling, will Obama finally make the "Change" he has promised us over 4 years now, or just keep on the same status quo path and all the evil that entails?? Not holding my breath here...
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Sauron_Daz » Fri Nov 30, 2012 1:48 am

Hammer_Time wrote:This news is horrible:

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/11 ... e-upgrade/

Pentagon Cries Poor, Starts $10 Billion Nuclear Weapon Upgrade


But imagine how much worse military spending would be if RMoney got elected!! :shock: :roll:

Whats another $10 billion when you are already $16 trillion in debt right??!! :whistle:

http://www.usdebtclock.org/


The weapons will be ready when the economic collapse hits this way. maybe that's also why..
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Re: Mark of the Beast

Postby Sauron_Daz » Fri Nov 30, 2012 1:49 am

clone wrote:
But imagine how much worse military spending would be if RMoney got elected!
I believe the election proved that Mitt Romney and Obama were two sides of the same coin with both answering many topics with "I'd have done it sooner" instead of "I'd have done it differently".

history has proven this case as well not just with Obama but certainly most obvious with Obama given the U.S. is still in Afghanistan, defense spending didn't move under Obama so far, that offshore prison is still up and running, American privacy rights are being run over roughshod under Obama.

aside from quasi nationalizing Health Care following Mitt Romney's example in that case Obama hasn't really done much differently than what George did..... although their has been a lot of talk about fixing the tax code even under the Democratic majority where they could have done anything.... instead they did next to nothing and covered it up by claiming they had a hard time getting health care through.... which was stupid given they had a majority of both houses, their was no resistance to be worried about.



In the end it matters not what side gets elected.
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